Speculative Fictions

Jon Beasley-Murray posts a stimulating review of Alessandro Fornazzari’s new book Speculative Fictions (http://www.upress.pitt.edu/BookDetails.aspx?bookId=36349), on Chile’s “neoliberal transition.” Here’s Beasley-Murray’s conclusion: “The immense virtue of Fornazzari’s book is that it quickly points us [towards the] interesting task of exploring the real complexity, the paradoxes and ironies as well as the continuing cruelties, of a society that is in no way as dedifferentiated as its right-wing boosters (and many of its left-wing critics) would like to think.”

Posthegemony

Speculative Fictions coverIn an epoch of postmodern, neoliberal “dedifferentiation,” in which the distinctions between the once-separate spheres of politics, economics, and culture have been steadily erased, what are the possibilities of “making a difference” through writing, film, or art? This is the question that Alessandro Fornazzari’s Speculative Fictions sets out to answer, with a focus on the Chilean transition from Pinochet’s dictatorship to the revived party system of the past couple of decades.

But looking merely at the political transition, Fornazzari suggests (in the steps of Willy Thayer, among others) would be misleading. For the shift from state violence to today’s liberal democracy conceals other continuities, and perhaps other, more significant changes that have taken place on a different timescale. Indeed, the book outlines three “different transitional forms: the economic (the neoliberal transition from the state to the market), the political (the transition from dictatorship to democracy), and the aesthetic” (115). And…

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About nicholasjoncrane

Assistant Professor of Geography at University of Wyoming
This entry was posted in Aesthetics, Art Practices, and Politics, History, Historiography, Memory, The Americas. Bookmark the permalink.

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