‘Political geographical perspectives on settler colonialism’ in the political geography section of GECO

We have recently published Stepha Velednitsky, Sara Hughes, and Rhys Machold in the political geography section of Geography Compass, on ‘Political geographical perspectives on settler colonialism.’ The review article provides a comprehensive survey of tendencies, past and present, at the intersection of political geography and settler colonial studies, and, more generally, of political-geographical engagement with the settler colonialism analytic. The abstract is below.

Given the centrality of land, territory, and sovereignty to settler colonial formations, it is unsurprising that geographers and other scholars working on such topics are increasingly finding settler colonial studies fruitful in their research agendas. However, work on settler polities in political geography has historically been marked by the present absence of this framework, which has been consequential in terms of circumscribing the kinds of political analysis that geographers can offer. It also limits the nature, depth, and scope of radical critique of violent domination by skirting certain questions about the core drivers of dispossession and responsibility for them. This article examines political geographical engagement (or lack thereof) across each of four themes: population management/governance, territory/sovereignty, consciousness, and narrative, paying particular attention to works which challenge the present absence of settler colonial theory in political geography. We argue that analyzing settler colonial formations as such is essential to conceptualizing their workings and linkages or disjunctures with other forms of empire. Yet this focus also has broader political stakes related to geography’s complicity with racialized state power, violence, and empire, as well as and efforts to decolonize the discipline.

About nicholasjoncrane

Associate Professor of Geography and International Studies at the University of Wyoming
This entry was posted in Political Economy, Political Geography, Politics, Settler colonialism, The Americas, Transnationalism. Bookmark the permalink.

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